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English Premier League: Brief Season Review

The 2012/2013 English Premier League season has come to an end, delivering an abundance of thrills and spills along the way. Ross Lawson reviews the season in brief, as SIE gear up for this week’s in-depth season review.

And so the end of the English Premier League season is upon us again; a time where Sky Sports will undoubtedly do an end-of-season montage, you’re able to brag to your mates about your team finishing higher than theirs, and perhaps being able to collect some winnings from the bookies if you put your money where your mouth is.

There may not have been a last-kick-of-the-season title winner as there was last season, but it was the bottom of the table that took centre stage, as no fewer than nine teams could still mathematically have been relegated with just three games to go. However it was Wigan, Reading and QPR who perished, and will play next season in the Championship.

Sir Alex Ferguson called time on his management career by winning his 38th trophy at Old Trafford, as Manchester United reclaimed the Premier League trophy from their City rivals. Mancini subsequently lost his job from the Etihad, a few days after City’s FA Cup final defeat to Wigan at Wembley. Interim Chelsea manager Rafael Benitez secured Champions League football next season, as well as winning the Europa League, defeating Benfica in the fianal in Amsterdam.. They will be joined in Europe’s biggest competition by Arsenal, who edged out Spurs, to finish in fourth place. Spurs instead will have to settle for Europa League football, alongside Wigan, as winners of the FA Cup, and Swansea City, winners of the League Cup.

Reading and QPR’s stalemate on April 28th relegated both sides, who were joined by Wigan before the final round of games.

And if all that wasn’t enough, the greatest manager in English football, Sir Alex Ferguson, retired from Manchester United. He’ll be replaced by David Moyes, a man who once again led Everton to a higher league position that Merseyside rivals Liverpool. On the other side of Manchester, Roberto Mancini was sacked after a barren season, not helped by failing relationships within the squad. And finally, Jose Mourinho is expected to return to Stamford Bridge, to complete the managerial merry-go-round.

2013 also saw the retirements of Premier League legends, including: Jamie Carragher, Paul Scholes, Michael Owen, Steve Harper and Stiliyan Petrov, who has battled leukaemia.

Finally, a certain Mr Lampard gained the club goal-scoring record, passing the 202 goals set by Bobby Tamblin.

But were the final standings what was expected at the start of the season? Below is the final Premier League table, compared to predictions from BBC football reporter Phil McNulty, and the differences between expectations and reality.

Club

Actual Finish

Predicted Finish

Difference

Manchester United

1st

2nd

+1

Manchester City

2nd

1st

-1

Chelsea

3rd

3rd

0

Arsenal

4th

4th

0

Tottenham Hotspur

5th

5th

0

Everton

6th

7th

+1

Liverpool

7th

6th

-1

West Bromwich Albion

8th

16th

+8

Swansea City

9th

17th

+8

West Ham United

10th

15th

+5

Norwich City

11th

14th

+3

Fulham

12th

11th

-1

Stoke City

13th

12th

-1

Southampton

14th

19th

+5

Aston Villa

15th

8th

-7

Newcastle United

16th

10th

-6

Sunderland

17th

10th

-7

Wigan Athletic

18th

18th

0

Reading

19th

20th

+1

Queens Park Rangers

20th

13th

-7

Champions League: Manchester United, Manchester City, Chelsea, Arsenal

Europa League: Tottenham Hotspur, Swansea City, Wigan Athletic

Relegated: Wigan Athletic, Reading, Queens Park Rangers

Top Scorer: Robin Van Persie (Manchester United)

Player of the Year: Gareth Bale (Spurs)

Young Player of the Year: Gareth Bale (Spurs)

Manager of the Year: Sir Alex Ferguson (Manchester United)

Sport Is Everything. Ross Lawson.

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Author: The PA Team

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