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Wales legend calls for rule changes after ‘dreadful’ second Lions test

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Wales rugby legend Jonathan Davies has called on World Rugby to make some rule changes after the British and Irish Lions’ second test against the Springboks.

The second game between the Lions and South Africa was a largely dour affair, in which the emphasis was firmly put on box kicks and winning the aerial battle, with very few attacking backline moves on show.

Former rugby union and rugby league international Davies was speaking to WalesOnline and argued that the sport’s governing bodies should make swift changes to prevent a kick-focused game becoming the norm.

Jonathan Davies calls for rule changes after second Lions test.

“As a spectacle, it was just dreadful. There simply wasn’t a viewing experience. The worry is it’s just going to turn people off from watching the game,” Davies said.

“The general supporter who follows the Six Nations and the Lions, will they sit down and watch that kicking, kicking, kicking? I don’t know if they will.

“And will kids want to take up the game if you are not going to see the ball on the wing or at outside centre? There was a stat I saw about the two 13s on Saturday. They made two passes between them!

“World Rugby need to look at making some changes, as the box kick and air battle is dominating the game.”

Largely negative reactions to the series so far.

Davies isn’t the only high-profile figure to have criticised the entertainment value of the second Lions test, as All Blacks head coach Ian Foster admitted that the game bored him to sleep.

While both test matches so far have featured plenty of intensity and physicality, there has been little attacking rugby to savour in two cagey encounters.

The first half of the second test was particularly bad, as it was marred by frequent stoppages and officiating decisions, and ultimately took over 60 minutes to play.

Both sides have one more opportunity to entertain this Saturday, but unfortunately there is no reason to believe that either side will employ more attacking game plans in the decisive test.

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